Wednesday, May 17, 2017

5 Solo Car Camping Tips for the Wilderness Wanderer

Now that the days are warming up nicely and the nights are only slightly cool, you may want to consider enjoying nature a bit more. Solo car camping trips are often the way to go if you need some time by yourself to relax, unwind and get away from the stressors of work. However, because solo camping is not for the faint of heart, consider these tips before your first time roughing it.

Get Familiar with Camping

If you have never been camping before, solo car camping is most likely not for you. You need to be familiar with the basics of roughing it, such as laying a fire, keeping away from wild animals and hiking. You should also know the basics of first aid and wilderness survival to ensure that you will not make a newbie mistake on your first solo camping trip.

Pack Lightly

Since you will need to be transporting everything yourself, you should pack lightly, particularly if you plan on parking your car and hiking to a nearby location to sleep. Water and food are some of the biggest items you should carry, but make a few adjustments to lighten your load. For example, instead of carrying an entire water purifier, use space-saving purification tablets, and instead of using firewood for cooking, carry a small gas or alcohol-burning stove.

Pick the Right Car

Your car is probably your best bet for safety because you will count on it to get you back home and to keep you and your belongings safe from wildlife and weather. Visit a dealership and choose a small SUV that is good for rugged terrain, such as the GMC Acadia or the Jeep Grand Cherokee. A Subaru Forester is a great compact SUV that has plenty of space for cargo.

Stay Slightly on the Grid

Make sure that someone knows where you are going to be before you leave. While camping is not a time that you want to stay connected to your phone, you may want to have access to a phone charger while you are gone in case of emergency. Additionally, make sure that your contact person knows your license number and make and model of vehicle.

Travel with Emergency Devices

You may not have cell phone capabilities everywhere you camp. Definitely invest in a battery-powered weather radio and a whistle. You may also want to purchase or rent a personal locator beacon to help rescuers find you should you need help.

While your first solo car camping trip may be filled with worry over whether something bad will happen, if you will run out of food or if you will encounter a dangerous wild animal, you will quickly begin learning the ropes and realizing that if you practice basic safety techniques you can have a pleasurable and safe trip by yourself. Soon you will begin connecting with yourself and discovering more about what makes you who you are. Also, remember that if you are camping in state or national parks, you can reach out to park rangers who will have helpful information about the lay of the land.


About the Author:
Dixie Somers is a freelance writer and blogger for business, home, and family niches. Dixie lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and is the proud mother of three beautiful girls and wife to a wonderful husband.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

How to Prepare an Electricity-free Kitchen

There are a number of situations in which you may find yourself without electricity and you want to be prepared all of them. Depending on the number of people in your family or group, your setup needs may vary. Here are some options to explore for making sure that you can still prepare wholesome homemade meals in the event you find yourself without power.

Small but Powerful

For something small and compact that can travel easily, consider getting a Pocket Rocket by MSR. They are a longstanding staple of backpackers all over the world and can literally be assembled with one hand and weigh mere ounces. They pack enough heat to boil a couple cups of water in a few minutes. However, their gas canisters typically do not hold more than 6 hours of burning fuel and have to be replaced frequently. If you are looking for a small but portable way to boil water in less than two minutes for your dehydrated meal, a JetBoil may be your best bet in that arena. The size of a large coffee cup, they screw into the top of a gas canister for added stability and windproofing. JetBoils also come with attachments to turn them into a French press, a frying pan and a cooking pot.

Feast or Famine

For larger groups, you are going to want a stove and cooking area that has multiple burners and a larger surface. Stoves that collapse and are easily transportable, like the classic Coleman double burner, are a great option for a family of four or small group of people. What these kinds of stoves do not offer is a cooking platform or a food preparation area. If you are going to be stationary for a while, consider getting a table with legs and a side food preparation table. Stoves, like the Camp Chef Pro Series Deluxe Three, are equipped with propane tanks that hold a large amount of gas and are refillable and the dual platforms on either side are useful for setting utensils, condiments and cutting boards.

Accessories

For the sake of longevity, invest in metal, rather than plastic, utensils. Melting or breaking a plastic spatula will render it useless. Metal utensils hold up for a long time — same goes for your plates and cups. Put together a kitchen box with long lasting supplies such as reusable towels (as opposed to one time use paper towels), waterproof matches and fire starter. It is wise to stock up on gas canisters or propane to ensure that you have enough cooking fuel in the event that you lose power and have to fire up one of your cook stove substitutes. If you don't want to worry about fuel, consider getting a large griddle to turn any camp fire or heat source into a cookable surface as long as the area is flat.



Author Bio: W.M. Chandler is a Colorado native and works best with her head in the clouds. She is an avid researcher and enjoys writing about unfamiliar subjects. She writes passionately about nature and the outdoors, human connections and relationships, nutrition and politics. Twitter: @wmchandler1212

Tuesday, May 09, 2017

8 Reasons Why You Need Food Preparedness in Your Life

As the political climate, acts of terrorism, and natural disasters threaten the peace and security of people worldwide, it’s not uncommon to feel uneasy and anxious about the future. While you don’t have control over much of what happens in life, making sure you’re adequately prepared in case of an emergency can help you regain some peace of mind. Here are the 8 reasons you need to establish food storage in your home today.
  1. Peace of Mind During a Disaster


    As mentioned above, perhaps the best reasons to have food storage in your home is for the peace of mind this preventative measure will give you during a disaster. Rather than having to worry about how and where to get food, you can rest easy that a major basic need is already taken care of.

  2. Food to Sustain During Financial Crisis


    In the event of a cut in pay or the loss of a job, you know you have a way to provide food for your family while you get back on your feet. Unemployment is a real problem these days, but you can shore up against financial windfall, providing you and your family some wiggle room in the event of a crisis.

  3. Comfort that Your Family Will Be Provided For


    A lot can be said about peace of mind and the comfort that comes with knowing you’re prepared for even the direst situation. Your family is your most important asset, and knowing they’ll always have food to sustain them is a great comfort.

  4. Ability to Help Others


    There are always people in need, whether due to homelessness, financial problems, or natural disaster. With the help of food storage, you can share what you have with others who are less fortunate. Share food with a neighbor, donate to a charity or a food pantry. There is a multitude of options, but you can’t use any of them unless you’re prepared first.

  5. Help During a Pandemic


    In the event of a pandemic, you could potentially be housebound for months. With long-term food storage built up, you can survive this time without the risk of being contaminated trying to get food or water.

  6. Peace in Social Chaos


    There is continued civil unrest around the globe, and as this social chaos inevitably increases, there may come a time your city is affected. In the event you won’t have access to food, whether from fear of leaving your home or due to the destruction of riots and looting, having food storage might be a lifesaver.

  7. Sustenance During War


    In times of war, food is more scarce; prices drive up, and rationing often limits what’s available. With food storage present in your home, neither of these scenarios need to be a worry for your family.

  8. Severe Weather or Natural Disaster


    During a flood, earthquake, tornado, fire, or any other natural disaster, you may be left trapped in your home for days or weeks on end. If you have food storage in your home, you care rest assured that your family will survive these troubled times until help and relief can reach you.

Peace in Preparedness


During times of turmoil, preparation equals confidence, and making sure you have adequate food storage is an excellent way to prepare. Stock up on canned goods, fill containers with water, and consider using mylar bags and vacuum sealers to help keep food fresh longer. Being prepared in the face of disaster gives you one less thing to worry about.


About the Author:
Rachel Libby is a content crafter. She has a passion for writing and providing people with mountains of knowledge. In addition, Rachel also works at Big Leap and enjoys all things marketing and helping businesses grow. Speaking of mountains, you can find her exploring the wild terrain of Utah in her quest for adventure and cool Instagram photo opportunities.

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