Friday, December 20, 2013

4 People Who Faced Disaster- And How They Made It Out Alive

photo: socialbrite.org

Read on the following blog to instil some amount of courage in yourself to fight for your loved ones. These 4 stories are sure to move you.

Fire and Wind

Frank Vaplon was made of sterner stuff than his neighbors who had all left Poway in Calif. when chaparral embers flew through the air driven by the 75 mph winds that lashed the woods around.

Vaplon was not unprepared. He realized that there was a fire raging somewhere out there by the smell of the smoke. He immediately went to work and rigged up a fire-fighting system with a long fire hose and the large tank in his property. He poured water on anything that could be exposed to the fire. Clad in full gear of a fire-fighter, Vaplon found his efforts at containing the fire turning futile and so turned around focused his attention on his house.

His woodpile caught fire when an ember hit it. He not only succeeded in curbing the fire but also saved a neighbor’s house. The only items he lost were two gas tanks that exploded as he was entering the safety of his house after the fire was shooed away from his property.

Intuitive Scouts

photo: turner.com

When the scout leader Fred Ullrich heard the siren at Little Scout Ranch, Iowa, he braced himself to face the tornado that was to come his way in a hurry. He instructed the 65 boys under his charge to dive under the tables in the shelter they were staying and tried to close the door from outside. The wind that was blowing at 150-mph was not about to accommodate him and threw him down. The wind also ripped apart the Scout shelter and the boys were left out in the open.

The able-bodied boys soon got busy with administering to the injured. Ullrich, who had been trained in CPR, consciously put his fear aside and went to work. The training the boys had had was put to good use. They had even set up a triage center as a preamble to admission to a hospital.

A Miraculous survival

Daryl Jané had no idea that he would be rudely interrupted by a snowstorm on his way to Trout Lake to indulge in a spot of sky-watching. He left Bainbridge Island, Wash. earlier. He saw the snow piling up fast on the forest service road and soon enough his Jeep Cherokee’s tires sank into the snow.

Jané surmised wrongly that he would be rescued in a matter of hours but it took 14 days for a snowmobile club to rescue him. How did he survive 14 days in the biting cold with only a gallon of water, some food he taken with him and a sleeping bag in his possession? Fortunately, he knew that eating snow could prove fatal though he was dangerously dehydrated. He set out with his jug and as luck would it, found water in a depression in the snow. After drinking a whole gallon of water, he grew bold enough to throw away the good-bye note he had written earlier.

Hurricane as Fun

Mark Vorderbruggen and his friends were ready when Hurricane Ike which had already killed 48 struck the Caribbean. They cleared the yards in neighborhood houses of anything that could turn into a missile. The hurricane, in the event, left his house largely intact. The mountainous piles of debris had to be cleared. The local community was prudent enough to use the resources sparingly. They took turns to cook for the whole population. What Vorderbruggen said later about the ordeal takes the cake, “It was kinda fun”.


Written By:

Rogier Higgs blogs about various things technical and non technical. He also does the brand management for shipping skis and is the brain behind their marketing strategy. He makes use of a lot of visual graphics for communication clarity, which is his strong point.

1 comment:

  1. Besides survival skills I think in natural disaters so much depends on your will to stay alive and good old God (or whomever or whatever you believe in) saying it isnt your time.

    ReplyDelete

Tell us what you think.