Wednesday, November 30, 2016

A Few Items for Your Dog’s Bug-Out Bag

California Mountain Dog If you haven’t considered your pet for bug in and bug out situations, it’s about time you should. We’ve all seen videos of people caught in disasters who’re more concerned about finding their cat than they are about where they’re going to sleep at night. Besides, pets will be of immense value post-collapse when it comes to moral support. To them, all it matters is that you’re still together...

In today’s article I want to focus on dogs and their needs in bug out scenarios. Depending on its size and strength, a dog may or may not carry his own stuff. The rest will either go in your bug out vehicle’s trunk or inside your own BOB.

So let’s see some of these items that you should make part of your survival plan.

An Emergency Leash

If your dog is anything like mine, he’s going to be really, really scared if and when general panic sets in. You’re going to want to keep him on a leash at all times, particularly if you’re bugging out with your car. If you’re the one driving, you can’t afford Lucky to distract you, so have someone sit with him on the back seat.

Food and Water

Don’t pack too much, because they’re heavy. It all depends on the size of your dog. Store extra food and water in your car’s trunk and beware of high temperatures. Anything inside your car’s trunk that’s perishable should be rotated more often than what’s in your pantry or basement.

A Collapsible Dish

You can use it for other things, such as collecting rainwater or foraging. The more containers you have with you, the better. You never know what you’ll end up putting in them.

A Dog Crate... Also Collapsible

This is something you could add to your car bug out bag and even use it to store other supplies. Particularly useful if you’re going to camp in the woods, if you don’t want your dog to run away while you’re sleeping.

A First Aid Kit

You can opt for those pre-packed ones on the market or you can assemble one yourself. Just keep in mind that there’s a difference between a FAKs for people and those for dogs. If you do decide to assemble them yourself, I suggest you keep them separated.

Body Armor

Come again? Why would your dog need it? Because you’ll never know when a wild animal might attack him... or get hit by a bullet You don’t want him unprotected when he’s trying to protect you. Soft armor vests are lightweight and have lots of pockets where you can fit many of the items given in this article.

Two Inflatable Mini-Beach Balls

This may sound weird but consider the scenario where you all need to cross a large body of water. Even if your dog can swim, can he do it with weight on his back? If you add something inflatable on both sides of the backpack, it’ll be much easier. A couple of small inflatable 5” beach balls will do.

Glow Sticks

Glow sticks make great emergency lighting because they have a 5-year shelf life (so long as you don’t crack them open), they pose no fire risk and are powerful enough to light your way. Tie one to your dog’s collar to be able to see him in the dark.

A Few Ziploc Bags

They have numerous alternative uses so it’s always good to have a few. These should be in every survival bag (GHB, BOB, car BOB) and even as part of your edc – they are crucial for survival because they have so many uses.

Vaccination Records

If you can laminate them, even better. If your dog gets lost and someone finds him or if he bites someone, they might help.

Dog Nail Clippers...

...because SHTF hygiene is crucial.

Dog Boots

During a bug out, it’ll be easier for your pup to run and walk on uneven terrain. Boots don’t add too much extra weight on its back. The only thing to do beforehand is getting it used to wearing them.

A Small Toy

A toy might keep a scared dog busy. If you put it in your own bag, you can use it to make him come to you if he strays away.

A Muzzle

A scared dog is an aggressive dog, and you don’t want him biting someone to hinder your bug-out. A muzzle will also tell other people that your dog bites (even if he doesn’t), and some of them will be discouraged to attack you.

A Respirator Mask

...in case Yellowstone decides to erupt, but also useful in case of a nuclear meltdown to keep radiation particles out of his respiratory system, though these respirators aren’t bulletproof; they’re just better than nothing, for larger particles such as dust.

A Few Items for Your Own Use

If you have enough room, you might as well put things that are really for the benefit of everyone. For example, you can put some dryer lint, because it’s a great fire-starter as well as lightweight...

Now What?

One you start getting some of these things, you’ll need to get your dog accustomed to wearing boots and having a backpack on his back. Heck, you can even go as far as simulating a bug out situation just to see how much Lucky will slow you down and see how easy it’ll be to keep him near you when you’re in a hurry.


The writer of this article would like to follow his own advice and remain anonymous.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Natural Disaster Prep: Essential Supplies for a Local Emergency

A disaster caused by a severe storm, earthquake, volcano or other natural event can happen at any time. Although you should always prepare for a natural disaster based on the types of emergencies that occur in your geographic region, you should also prepare by having the following supplies in emergency kits in your home, office and vehicle:

Medical Supplies

Natural disasters often cause physical injury to people and pets. These injuries can range from small scratches and cuts to broken bones, burns, concussions and blocked airways. Set up a tote or pack with the most important common medical supplies, including bandages, antiseptic, burn cream, wraps, antihistamines, pain killers, splints, cold and heat packs, and a folded heat reflective emergency blanket. Additionally, add an emergency event common injury and treatment guide to your kit and a 30-day supply of medicines sealed in a water-proof plastic zipper-style bag.

Clothing and Blankets

Sometimes a disaster forces individuals and families to relocate at a moment's notice. Pack at least three outfits and a week's worth of underclothes and socks in your kit along with a tightly rolled up regular blanket secured with a belt. Although an emergency heat blanket is smaller and great for short-term use, it's also wise to have a non-thermal regular blanket handy for more frequent use when you're displaced from warm conditions for longer than a day. You can also use the blanket to cover the ground to create an eating area or as a privacy screen at a shelter.

Activated Charcoal Filters

Dehydration is always a possibility after a natural disaster. Although you might add bottled water to your natural disaster kit, a water purification system offers a more lightweight and long-term solution. You can easily buy activated charcoal filters to add to your emergency kit. Keep them in your kit or even a backpack to remove many types of contaminants and impurities like dirt, sand and organic and inorganic chemicals from rain barrel, stream, river, lake and other water sources.

Non-Perishable Foods

Beyond clean water, you also need to have access to nutrient-rich foods. Regularly refresh your emergency natural disaster kit with non-expired granola bars, dried fruit, vegetable chips, canned foods and other non-perishables so that you don't have to worry about dealing with low energy, poor thinking and hunger right after a natural disaster. Don't worry about the expense of creating your emergency kits. You will see that the upfront investment of time and money was well worth it when a disaster happens.


Written by Rachelle Wilber

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Ways to Secure Your Home if You Can't Afford a Home Security System

Having a security system is one of the best ways you can protect your home against burglary and intrusion. However, since most of today’s surveillance systems come with expensive price tags, they aren’t always convenient to have, especially if you are on a tight budget.

If you are looking for ways to secure your home without relying on a security system, here are a few ideas you should try.
  1. Change your locks

    Traditional locks may not be enough to protect your home anymore, especially with how smart burglars are getting these days. If you can’t get a security system, you should consider changing your locks to tougher and more durable ones.

    Deadbolt locks are a great option since they are more resistant against lock picking and bumping. They extend deep into door frames which means they won’t easily get broken in case an intruder uses brute force on your door.

    Your locks, however, can only be effective if used properly. Leaving your doors unlocked most of the time only defeats the purpose of upgrading them.

  2. Get a good door

    Your door should be of the same strength as your door lock. If your lock is durable but your actual door isn’t, it can still break and give access to intruders. In finding a good door, make sure it’s sturdy and isn’t hollow.

    If you can’t get a solid door, you can reinforce its back with a metal plate. You can just paint it over to make it look more appealing. It’s a cheaper yet effective alternative to having your entire door replaced.

  3. Know who knocks on your door

    Burglars and intruders are finding more ways to access homes without getting caught or even drawing suspicion. They can wear uniforms or claim to be somebody they aren’t. If someone knocks on your doorstep, make sure to verify his identity first. It’s not enough to check his uniform and identification cards since they can easily be forged.

    In protecting yourself and your home, you’ll want to prevent an incident from happening in the first place. Before someone could hurt and attack you inside your home, you should prevent their access in the first place. Take, for example, one of the recent cases of home attack where a man was found fired, bound and beaten by a home intruder.

  4. Build a connection with your neighbors

    Your neighbors are the first people who can sense something’s wrong in your home. They are also the first people who can recognize strangers in your neighborhood.

    If your area doesn’t have an existing neighborhood watch program yet, you can try organizing one. This type of program is one of the most traditional and effective ways to secure homes. If you can’t build one, you should, at least, get to know your neighbors. You can invite them over for dinner or gift them with freshly baked cookies or your specialty dish.

  5. Secure your valuables

    Since there’s no security system to ward off burglars or notify you in case of an attack, it’s a good idea if you can keep an inventory of your valuable items. You can list them down and take pictures of them so that in the event that someone steals them, you can provide a proof that the items are yours.

    Consider getting a safe and hiding it in an area that isn’t too obvious. There are also a lot of DIY hiding spots you can make at home, such as hidden book storage, extra slot in your cabinets or little storage boxes that mimic regular wall sockets.




Author’s Bio: Rose Cabrera specializes in reviewing home security products and systems. She has covered a wide range of brands with Ezviv Mini Security Camera as one of her latest reviews.

Monday, November 14, 2016

6 Vital Emergency Kit Additions

Emergency kits contain many items that you'll need during a crisis, such as flashlights, flares, bandages, radios, and bottled water. These items are necessary staples, but there are plenty of useful items that aren't usually included in your basic kit.

Water Purifier

Bottled water is a definite necessity to include in your kit, but there's always the possibility that you will run out. Keeping a purifier on hand will allow you to purify nearby sources of water if your stock of bottled water runs out.

Vitamin Supplements

You never know when your alertness level could be the difference between life and death, so it's important that you stay awake during a crisis. Vitamin supplements can help with fatigue by giving you bursts of energy, and can also help to boost a person’s immune system when they're dealing with high levels of stress. The last thing you want to worry about is getting sick during a crisis. Pre-packaged vitamin blends often have daily essentials in addition to energy boosters.

Power Banks

You may not have cell phone service during a crisis, but you should still keep your phone fully charged. Your cell phone is your lifeline, so make sure you have a spare charger to put in your emergency kit. Power banks are more useful than standard chargers because they can charge your cell phone even if you don't have electricity. Many crises leave victims without electricity, so a power bank definitely qualifies as a necessity.

Pepper Spray

Criminal activity still occurs during natural disasters, so it's important to be prepared for it. Protecting yourself from the immediate danger should be your first priority, but that doesn't mean you need to leave yourself defenseless to other threats. Pack one container of pepper spray for each member of your home so that no one is left defenseless.

Portable Toilet

You might not have access to a bathroom during a crisis, so it's vital that you have a portable toilet to avoid any discomfort. Many outdoor retailers, like Blackpine Sports, offer high quality portable toilets for camping or emergencies. If you invest in a portable toilet, be sure to also get plenty of extra waste disposal and odor control bags to go with it to keep sanitary and comfortable.

Cash and Copies of Identification

If you're forced to evacuate your area, you'll need cash and identification down the line. Identification is especially important in the event that your home is destroyed or your property is damaged, as you may need it to present to law enforcement or your insurance company.

You can never be too prepared for a crisis. Prepare for any emergency and pack your provisions accordingly. Stocking up on necessities now is the best way to reduce your risk of danger later.


Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and recent graduate of the University of New Mexico. She writes for many online publications and blogs about home improvements, family, and health. She is an avid hiker, biker and runner. Contact her via twitter @BrookeChaplan.

Tuesday, November 08, 2016

Preparing Your Kids with Gun Safety Lessons

If society collapsed, would your children know how to handle themselves in a world where knowledge of firearms was elemental to survival? Or, in today's society, say your child visits a friend’s house when their parents aren't home and they find a gun in the closet. Would they know enough to be safe? These are questions that matter to every mother. 41 percent of Americans have a gun in their home, according to a 2015 Gallup poll, so your child is likely to be around guns at some point whether you own one or not. Here are some basics that every parent should teach their children about gun safety.

Set the Example

The most powerful lesson is a good example. If you’re well-versed in gun safety, you'll able to teach your child more effectively. Even if you’re already familiar with guns and gun safety, it’s a good idea to take a refresher course and brush up on the basics so they’re fresh in your mind when you teach your child. The National Rifle Association publishes a directory of training courses taught by qualified instructors that you can browse to find a course near you. Learn with the type of firearm you intend to use or the type of firearm you intend to get your child when they're old enough. If you're looking to save money, try browsing a wide selection of quality used firearms from a trusted online supplier.

Follow Gun Storage Safety Rules

A big part of gun safety is storing your guns where your children can’t get them. As they get older, you can take the opportunity to teach them how to properly store guns.

Project ChildSafe recommends that guns be stored unloaded and locked in a gun vault, safe or cabinet. Ideally, your storage location should not be known by your children, especially if they haven't been taught gun safety. Furthermore, ammunition should be kept in a separate location, as should keys.

For additional protection, you can use a gun locking device to prevent the gun from firing. Yet another option is to break a firearm down and store the parts separately to ensure that it won't be misused.

Guns should always be unloaded and cleaned after use and before storage. Even if you think the gun is already unloaded, double check. Sometimes ammunition remains in a gun’s magazine after it has been fired.

Teach Gun Safety Rules

Learning how to handle guns safely is another part of basic firearms safety. The most fundamental rule is to always point a gun’s muzzle in a safe direction, meaning away from yourself and other people so that if the gun were to go off, it would not harm anyone. When holding a gun at your side, make sure it points to the ground and not at your feet or another part of your body.

Another basic principle is to always assume a gun is loaded. Don’t assume a gun is unloaded just because you took it out of storage or because someone told you it was empty. You never know what someone else may have done with the gun before you had it, and you should never just assume that the magazine is empty without.

A third basic principle is to never load or cock a firearm before you’re ready to actually fire it; keep guns unloaded when not in use. Also, pick guns up with your finger outside the trigger guard rather than inside.

Teach Your Children What to Do if They Find a Gun

There's always the chance that a child will come across a gun before they're adequately trained and old enough to safely handle it. If this happens, they need to know what to do. Make sure they know that if they find an unattended weapon they should get an adult to deal with it rather than trying to handle the gun themselves. Explain that a gun can accidentally go off and should only be handled by someone capable of handling it safely. Some toys resemble guns, so teach your children to be careful about assuming a weapon is a toy and to assume it is real unless they know otherwise. Likewise, teach them to never to point a gun at anyone and to always assume a gun is loaded.




Roy Rasmussen, coauthor of Publishing for Publicity, is a freelance writer who helps select clients write quality content to reach business and technology audiences. His clients have included Fortune 500 companies and bestselling authors. His most recent projects include books on cloud computing, small business management, sales, business coaching, social media marketing, and career planning.

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