Hold Your Horses! How to Prepare Land for Keeping Livestock

You may have additional land that could be put to use. You might want to occupy this land with cattle for personal or commercial purposes. Whether you are raising animals for your own consumption or for market, your land needs to be prepared for the task at hand. The following are a few points to consider when getting your land ready to harbor livestock.

Testing Your Land for Contaminants

If you own land or are thinking about a large land purchase for raising livestock, it is important to have your land tested for contaminants before deciding to use your land for such a purpose. Land contamination can be the result of waste left behind from industrial or agricultural activities by a previous owner, or it could arise from chemicals being dumped on your land. Whatever the case, you will want to make sure that your livestock has a clean environment free of harmful contaminants. This is why it is critical to work with experienced testers to arrive at a proper assessment of any contaminants that may exist on your property, and to know how to remove these contaminants.

Fencing Your Land

When it comes to preparing your land for raising livestock, you must take into consideration how you plan to contain your herd. A sturdy fence that encapsulates your land is always a good idea. The right kind of fence will not only keep your livestock on your land, but it can also work to keep unwanted predators out.

The Right Kind of Cover Crop

While many animals can be fed some kind of grain or other type of commercially sold feed, it is still important for livestock to be able to graze. This means seeding your land with the right kind of cover crop for the type of livestock you plan to raise. This makes it possible for your livestock to move about as it grazes to produce a better-quality meat.

Preparing a Water Source

Your land may cover many acres, but it may not have an established water source from which your livestock can drink. Dedicating a significant sized portion of your land for digging a pond can help to resolve this problem. Sure, it may cost a little to hire someone to come out with heavy equipment to do the digging, but a properly dug region for capturing water may be used both for drinking water and for stocking with fish. Setting up water troughs may serve as an alternative water source for your livestock as well. It really depends on how you want to address this particular aspect of meeting your livestock’s drinking needs.

Horses

Conclusion

Since owning livestock is a huge investment, it is critical to make sure the land you are using is properly prepared for the kind of livestock animals you plan to raise. Failing to meet all your livestock’s needs in your preparatory efforts could be disastrous. By having a well thought out plan to operate from, you can make certain that every aspect of your operation is addressed and functioning as it should to ensure that your livestock can adequately grow and thrive on your land.

About the Author:

Rachelle Wilber is a freelance writer living in the San Diego, California area. She graduated from San Diego State University with her Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism and Media Studies. She tries to find an interest in all topics and themes, which prompts her writing. When she isn’t on her porch writing in the sun, you can find her shopping, at the beach, or at the gym. Follow her on Twitter and Facebook: @RachelleWilber

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